MEET THE ARTIST

Korynn Morrison

Korynn Morrison is a National Art School graduate and Founder Director of The Art Passage located in Sydney’s Sutherland Shire.
Painting from her home studio in Helensburgh on the NSW South Coast, her intuitive abstract landscapes are a raw and performative collaboration with medium.

Drawing from the energetic qualities of artists such as Cy Twombly, Gerhard Richter and Richard Diebenkorn, she is fuelled by pushing the capabilities of her chosen mediums. Korynn’s studio practice has become incredibly organic and forever changing when it comes to her creative processes, often finding unconventional ways of resolving her work using both traditional an contemporary painting practices.

Known for her unique use of Oil & Cold Wax, her abstract landscapes are surfaces drenched in memory. A bold and direct response to the Australian landscape and a chase to capture the indescribable feelings associated with her memories in nature.

 “By letting go of structure and allowing chance to take organic form, I find that I am simply arriving in the studio each day and listening. Each mark answers a question that the last mark demands, until I am left with an artwork that breathes on it’s own.”

Since 2012 Morrison’s work has been included in a number of group exhibitions across Sydney and South Coast regions, as well as successful Solo Exhibitions at Hunters Hill Art Gallery in 2016 and The Art Passage in 2018.
The Art Passage was established by Korynn in 2018 with the help and support of Crockers Paint and Wallpaper. A space that is now dedicated to providing Artists with a professional gallery to promote and sell their work without the added stress of exhibition fees.

This new art space has formed a new and exciting artistic adventure for Korynn and the many artists that have become such a vital part of The Art Passage community.

 

By letting go of structure and allowing chance to take organic form, I find that I am simply arriving in the studio each day and listening. Each mark answers a question that the last mark demands, until I am left with an artwork that breathes on it’s own.